Extravagantly Articulate: Marc Nash’s Three Dreams in the Key of G

Splice is an extraordinary “venture with a lot of tiny moving parts” — among them an online review that covers some wonderfully challenging books. I thought I would reblog a Splice post as a tribute to its mission to “shake up conventional notions of what a novel can be” (as Hebblethwaite says of Nash’s book in this post).

Splice

by David Hebblethwaite

Marc Nash, Three Dreams in the Key of G Marc Nash, Three Dreams in the
Key of G
. Dead Ink Books. £9.99.
Buy direct from the publisher.

Three Dreams in the Key of G feels like an intervention. That’s how it has been published: the editorial aim of Dead Ink Books is “to bring the most challenging and experimental writing out from the underground”. That’s how it appeared on the shortlist for the Guardian‘s Not the Booker Prize this year: chosen as a wildcard entry by the previous year’s judges, who commended its complexity and difference. Even judging it from only its prose style, there’s the sense that Marc Nash’s book means to shake up conventional notions of what a novel can be. Here, for example, is the character Jean Ome building sandcastles with her daughter:

I am left to fill buckets with loose sand, then to compact them with a spade, before emptying…

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